Separating Twins for School

2 Reasons Other Than Higher Test Scores To Send Your Child To Pre-K

If you are thinking of keeping your child at home until he or she starts kindergarten, you may want to reconsider. Studies show that children who attend pre-k are more ready for kindergarten than kids who are taught at home by a parent. The national Early Childhood Longitudinal Study indicates that kids who attend pre-k have higher test scores in reading and math than kids who only receive parental care before kindergarten. Pre-k students even outscore children who attend other types of preschool programs or child care centers. In addition to higher test scores, here are two more reasons to send your child to pre-k. Parental training can be inconsistent. Regardless of your good intentions, chances are that teaching your child about his or her letters and numbers is not your only responsibility during the day. Even if you stay at home full-time, you may be inundated with other work, such as cleaning the house, paying bills and caring for your other children. At times, your child’s education will likely take a backseat to another household priority. With pre-k, there are trained teachers who systematically focus on preparing your child for kindergarten each day.  Your child can get used to school. For a child who has never attended a daycare or preschool, kindergarten can be a frightening change. It takes some children weeks to adjust to being away from a parent for a full day. There is usually no transitional step with kindergarten. A child who has never attended any type of school may go from only spending time at home to spending seven hours a day at kindergarten. Pre-k allows a child to gradually transition to full-time school. Many pre-k programs are tailored to the needs of the child and permit varying amounts of time at school. For instance, a pre-k program may offer full-day, half-day, and partial-week programs.  Full-day programs may work well for children who have spent time in a daycare environment or who have parents who work outside the home. However, for children who have never been enrolled in a daycare or who have parents who work from home, half-day or partial-week pre-k programs may be more suitable. Once the child has been adequately introduced to the concept of school, he or she will be more prepared to spend a full day at kindergarten. If your child has spent most of his or her time at home, pre-k […]

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Pre-Kindergarten Or Kindergarten: How Do You Know What To Pick?

If you don’t want to put your child in kindergarten because they would be one of the youngest in their grade, explore pre-K options. If you still need to have childcare, you may be able to find a program that offers both programs. There are a few things you want to consider before you choose a facility, and before you make the decision to keep your child out of kindergarten. Talk with the potential kindergarten school and the pre-K facility about the following things. Kindergarten Screening Most school districts and preschools or daycares will do kindergarten screening. This is where education professionals will screen a child to see if they have the academic, motor, physical and social skills to go to kindergarten. If your child has the screening done and you’re told that they have areas where they are behind and need to work on, it’s best to hold your child back for a year so they enter kindergarten fully prepared. Current Social Assessment Maturity has a lot to do with your child’s success in kindergarten. If their current educator or childcare provider thinks they may not do well going to kindergarten at their young age, this is something you have to take into consideration before you sign them up. If you think the child would be better with another year to mature, and play with other children during the day instead of going to school and having strict regimen, pre-K is the best choice. If your child has a problem getting along with other children because of possessiveness, they can’t properly communicate all of their needs, and they act shy and withdrawal from others, pre-K may be the better path for you. It can be difficult for medical professional to determine if your child should go to kindergarten or not, but there are signs that your child should be held back. If you are going back and forth about whether your child is ready for kindergarten or not, holding them back is the best way to be safe instead of sorry, if you don’t want to have your child repeat kindergarten. Pre-K options are going to help your child continue to grow emotionally and academically throughout the day, but there is going to be more free time and fun, as opposed to a more scheduled curriculum and different standards in kindergarten. Talk with the different educators to learn more […]

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Want Your Child To Have More Freedom In Learning? 5 Benefits Of A Montessori Education

Public schools have structured classrooms, and the teacher generally sets up the lesson plan for each day. A Montessori education was created by Maria Montessori. This type of education uses a child-centered approach that encourages your child to have independence and freedom within limits when it comes to learning. Below are three benefits of this type of education so you can make the best informed decision for your child. 1. Pace A Montessori education helps your child learn in their own unique way. The teacher sets up an individualized plan for each child, and then guides them through each level. Your child will not have to worry about competing with any of the other children in the classroom, and being able to take their time helps them to learn the subject material much better. For example, if your child is young and learning how to tie their shoes, they will not be rushed while they are learning. If your child is learning the alphabet, they will not have to rush through it. If they are better at math than other students are, such as learning to add numbers much more quickly, they could move up to division before everyone else in the class does. 2. Self Discipline Your child will have the ability to choose the activities they want to do each day, as well as how long they want to stay on each task. The teacher will have some rules and guidelines set in place, however, to ensure your child is learning what they need to. But, allowing your child to choose on their own helps them with self-discipline, as well as motivation.  3. Learning Styles Some children learn better by doing, while others learn better by listening. For this reason, Montessori teachers are trained to accommodate the different learning styles so your child will be able to learn the materials much better and easier. For example, if your child is learning about how volcanoes work, some children may learn quicker by listening to the teacher, while others may learn better by creating their own volcano. Your child will also have the choice to work on their own if they prefer. The teacher will make sure they are learning the materials, however. Visit a Montessori school like Piedmont Hills Montessori Academy & School to help you make the final decision on if this is the right type of education on whether […]

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3 Ways You Can Build Up Your Relationship with Your Child Care Provider

It is important to have a strong relationship with your child care provider. Since the provider is responsible for watching your child for several hours a day, it is important that you develop a partnership. To help build and nurture a relationship with your provider, here are some tips.  Honor Appointments and Schedules Your child care provider is responsible for more than just your child. The provider’s time is just as important as yours is. If you have an appointment with the provider, show up on time. If you are unable to make it, call the provider ahead of time and reschedule. By honoring your appointments, you are showing the provider respect.  In addition to keeping appointments, you also need to be sure to drop off and pick up your child as agreed. Child care providers also have other responsibilities, such as children of their own. If you need to drop off your child early or pick him or her up late, ask ahead of time.  Respect the Rules Most child care providers give parents a printed set of rules that must be followed when a child is enrolled. If you received those rules, read them carefully and ensure that your child understands those which apply to him or her. At the same time, you need to remember those which apply to you. The provider’s rules are in place to ensure your child is safe and receives the care that he or she deserves. By breaking those rules, you make it harder for the provider to care for all of the enrolled children.  Communicate with the Provider One of the most important things you can do to build a sound relationship with your provider is to communicate. The provider needs to know what is going on with your child so that plans can be made to accommodate any situation. For instance, if your child is teething, the provider needs to know so that a plan to deal with fussiness and difficulty sleeping can be made.  You should also consider scheduling a meeting with the provider every few months so that you can discuss your child’s care. Pickup and drop off times are good for quick conversations, but it is difficult to discuss issues in depth. Try to work within the provider’s schedule for the meeting date and time.  Talk to your child care provider about other ways you can build […]

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Pros And Cons Of Montessori Schools

In a pursuit to find the best educational method for your child, you will discover that there are a wide range available and each one offers different things. If you are considering a Montessori education for your child, it is important to know the pros and cons of the method: Advantages One of the benefits of a Montessori education is that studies have shown that children who learn through this method are more creative and fare better when it comes to reading and mathematics. The effects are not limited to education, but extend into a child’s social behavior. Montessori children tend to be more positive and interested in justice than other children.  The Montessori educational style also focuses on children becoming independent. The classrooms do not have the same traditional makeup as other teaching methods, which encourages the children to learn for themselves with the guidance of a teacher.  Another benefit is that children are allowed to work at the pace that is right for them. For children who have different learning styles and speed, this can be especially beneficial. Instead of learning through the traditional means, a child would be encouraged to find the method that works for him or her. This could mean focusing on reading, listening to instruction, or creating objects.  Disadvantages The Montessori educational style might not work for every child. Children who rely on structure to learn could have trouble with this style. If a child has attended a more traditional classroom and is transferring to a Montessori school, there could be a significant period of adjustment. Fortunately for the parents and students, the instructors are committed to helping ease the woes associated with transitioning.  Just like other private education methods, there are tuition and fees associated with attending a Montessori school. However, some schools do have scholarships available to help offset the costs. If you have more than one child, you can possibly receive a discount for enrolling more them together.  If there is a not a Montessori school offering high school level classes, your child might have to transfer to a more traditional setting at some point. Your child would have to adjust to the new structured learning environment. Fortunately for your child, the skills that he or she learned in the Montessori school can help with adjusting. You can schedule a tour with a Montessori school to get a firsthand view of […]

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3 Things To Ask Potential Childcare Locations That You Are Considering For Your Child

When you are calling and visiting different childcare locations for your child, your main goal is likely to find the best place for your child. In order to do this, it is important to ask the caretakers at the child care locations several questions. These questions help you to get a feel for what the child care facility is like, and will either let you know that this is the place for your child, or it isn’t. This article will discuss 3 things to ask potential childcare locations that you are considering for your child: What Is The Child To Adult Ratio? According to the national regulations, a certain number of adults is required for a certain amount of children. The number of caregivers required does differ depending on age though. For example, 1 caregiver is required per 3 infants under the age of 6 weeks and 1 caregiver is required per 8 children who are 4 years old. There is also a maximum number of children allowed for the different ages, so this regulation must be followed as well. When you visit this facility you can ask the caretakers to make sure that they are following these regulations. This will give you confidence that your child will be getting the attention that they need while they are at daycare.  What Qualifications Do The Caregivers Have? It is also important that you ask the caregivers what qualifications they have. Generally they should have attended a childcare course, and some locations even require the childcare workers to have a degree in child care. As an added qualification, child care workers also need to be certified in CPR. When asking the child care workers what qualifications they have, you can also have them show you the certificates of completion for each qualification. This will leave you feeling confident that the child care workers are skilled enough to successfully care for your child.  Are They Accredited Nationally? If the child care location that you are considering is accredited nationally, this means that they meet the highest level of child care requirements. To become accredited nationally, the child care location will be reviewed and then told whether or not they meet these requirements. If they do not, the child care workers will go through different training courses until they are able to meet all qualifications to become nationally accredited. You can ask the child care […]

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Opening a Daycare? A Suggested Daily Schedule

Are you thinking about offering child care services? If so, one of the most crucial things you can do to make your daycare a success is to create a routine. Children thrive on routine; when they know what to expect, they feel comfortable and feel secure. Creating a schedule will help to ensure that each day will move smoothly and will keep everyone happy—including you. Not sure what type of routine will work for the children you are going to be caring for? Here’s a sample outline of daily events that will work well with young children of various ages; specifically ages 1 through 7. Do note that this schedule is just a suggestion; modify it accordingly to meet your specific needs. Sample Daycare Schedule Arrival—When children arrive at your facility, greet them in a friendly manner and direct their attention to activities that they can do on their own. For example, set out age-appropriate toys that kids can play with on their own and with other children. You could also set out activities that older kids can do on their own, like playing with clay, puzzles or coloring.  Circle Time—Once all children have arrived and have had a chance to settle in, invite them to circle time. During circle time, you and the children will sit together, sing songs, share stories, discuss the weather and any special activities/events that may be happening during the day. This is also the ideal time to provide a whole-group lesson. For instance, if you’re going to be doing an art activity that involves tearing paper, explain the activity during circle time and show children how to tear pieces of paper. Group Activity—Together, you and the children can do an activity. For instance, you could create the art project that you informed them about during circle time, take a nature walk or explore science through magnet play, water play, etc. Bathroom Break/Snack Time—After completing a group activity, take a bathroom break and give children a snack. Outside Play—Give children the opportunity to get outside, breathe in fresh air and get their energy out. Bathroom Break/Lunch—After being outside, take a bathroom break, wash hands and serve lunch. Nap/Quiet Time—Set out cots or sleeping mats for those who take naps. For those who don’t take naps, offer them quite activities, like looking at books or coloring. Snack—Another snack time can take place after nap/quiet time. Self-Directed […]

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4 Signs That A Vision Problem Is Impairing Your Child’s Learning

If your child is in elementary school and you suspect that vision related problems may be impairing their learning, you may be wondering how you can positively identify the signs that your child has a problem. Here are some common signs that you can look out for if you are concerned that your child may be having vision problems that are affecting learning. If your child is experiencing at least three of the issues listed below then it is a good idea to have their eyes tested by an elementary school health or eye care professional. Blinking Too Often Children who are suffering from visual problems often blink very often in an attempt to try and see better. If you notice that your child tends to blink a lot when reading or in other everyday situations then this is one sign that there may be a problem. Excessive blinking may also be accompanied by a lot of eye rubbing. Difficulty Reading If your child has a tendency to lose their place while reading and has a difficult time finding where they left off then it is reasonable for you to suspect that your child may be having vision problems. A child whose vision is impaired may also use a finger to guide them while they read words off a page. Your child may also start omitting or repeating words while reading if they are having visual problems. Placing Books Close To The Face If your child has a tendency to put their head close to the book they are reading they may be having difficulty seeing the words. A child with visual impairments may also put their head very close to the book when they are writing on a page. Hand-Eye Coordination Problems If your child has difficulty writing on a page with lines then this may be a sign that they have vision problems. Writing below or above the lines in a notebook is often an indicator that your child is having trouble with hand-eye coordination. Difficulty tying shoelaces, stacking blocks or coloring within the lines are also signs that your child has hand-eye co-ordination problems. Most of the signs listed above require that you become more aware of the actions of your child on a daily basis. Being observant is very important, since Identifying the signs that your child is having vision problems that are affecting their learning […]

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